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Borehole Optical Stratigraphy measurements through 4 full years at Summit, Greenland

Summary

These data consist of detailed measurements of the temporal and spatial variations of firn compaction to advance knowledge and understanding of ice deformation and across different fields, including remote sensing, snow morphology, and paleoclimatology. These details can be tracked over time to determine vertical motion and strain, which in the shallow depth is dominated by firn compaction. These data were gathered using the concept of Borehole Optical Stratigraphy (BOS).

Borehole Optical Stratigraphy is a method for recording the visual stratigraphy in a snow/firn borehole, generating a profile of brightness versus depth. The BOS instrument is a downward-looking video camera that is lowered down a borehole. The lens is wide-angle, and the view includes the walls of the borehole.

These data cover accumulation rates occurring between 1980-2008, and the data were collected between 2004-2009.

Data access

Additional information

Identifier
Versions
  • 1.0 (2011-01-05)
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Related projects
Spatial Type point
Frequency < 1 second
Language English
Grant Code 352584
ISO Topic Categories
  • geoscientificInformation
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Temporal coverage

Begin datetime 2004-01-01 00:00:00
End datetime 2009-01-01 23:59:59

Spatial coverage


Map data from IBCSO, IBCAO, and Global Topography.

Maximum (North) Latitude: 72.70, Minimum (South) Latitude: 72.50
Minimum (West) Longitude: -38.60, Maximum (East) Longitude: -38.40

Primary point of contact information

Bob Hawley <robert.l.hawley@dartmouth.edu>

Additional contact information

Citation

Example citation following ESIP guidelines:

Waddington, E., Hawley, B. 2011. Borehole Optical Stratigraphy measurements through 4 full years at Summit, Greenland. Version 1.0. UCAR/NCAR - Earth Observing Laboratory. https://doi.org/10.5065/D6XK8CPQ. Accessed 23 Oct 2019.

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