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CTW: Coastal Waves 1996 (Coastally Trapped Waves)

Summary

The Coastal Waves 1996 experiment was designed to study coastal atmospheric phenomena along the California coast. This study was designed to address several problems, including the cross-shore variability and turbulent structure of the marine boundary layer, the influence of the coast on the development of the marine layer and clouds, the ageostrophy of the flow, the dynamics of trapped events, the parameterization of surface fluxes, and the supercriticality of the marine layer. Based in Monterey, California, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 Hercules and the University of North Carolina Piper Seneca obtained a comprehensive set of measurements on the structure of the marine layer. The study focused on the effects of prominent topographic features on the wind. Downstream of capes and points, narrow bands of high winds are frequently encountered. The NCAR-designed Scanning Aerosol Backscatter Lidar (SABL) provided a unique opportunity to connect changes in the depth of the boundary layer with specific features in the dynamics of the flow field.

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Datasets from this project

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Temporal coverage

Begin Date 1996-06-01 00:00:00
End Date 1996-07-03 23:59:59

Spatial coverage

Maximum (North) Latitude: 43.40, Minimum (South) Latitude: 34.198
Minimum (West) Longitude: -126.621, Maximum (East) Longitude: -120.111